Showing posts with label school. Show all posts
Showing posts with label school. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Kindergarten

I suppose I should start off with excuses about this blog being dead (oops). I don't have much. My laptop was dying a slow death and I have a new one now.

Kingsley has been in school for a month and a half now. I was very anxious about kindergarten. In Ontario, kids start Junior Kindergarten the year they turn four, followed by Senior Kindergarten the year they turn five. Both are optional and both are full days, all day. The majority of kids go.

We had a few preliminary meetings with the school through the spring. I was feeling pretty confident right up until the week before school when I discovered that staff had been shuffled and Kingsley would be having new teachers we did not know, a new principal we had not met, a new ECE we didn't know and whether he'd have an EA in the classroom and how much and who it would be was all unknown also. And new secretaries who would not tell me anything.

I may have panicked.

A lot.

Thankfully, the school VP stepped in and we were able to see the classroom, meet the teachers and get names for everyone else before the big day.

The Tuesday after Labour Day, I dropped Kingsley off for his first day of school. He was beyond excited. Like, angry-at-me-for-taking-so-many-stinkin-pictures excited. Begging-to-go-RIGHT-NOW excited. "See ya, Mom" and not-looking-back excited. He was just so ready for it.


The girls also had great first days. They were more anxious about who their teachers were and who would be in their classes, whether they'd be with friends. It all worked out!


Amazingly, there have been very few blips. He LOVES school. He is so disappointed by weekends, asks every morning if he can go to school. He loves to be there, loves his friends, loves the playtime. He doesn't love the school work part, his pre-printing skills are feeble attempts at best. Whether this is a lack of interest or a long history of taking his time to develop skills, I'm not sure.

As with preschool, Kingsley is blending in like every other kid. I went in and spoke to the class about spina bifida and Kingsley's wheelchair in the first week. They were completely unfazed, mostly wanting to discuss their various scars or differences. I also sent a letter home for all of the parents explaining briefly that Kingsley has spina bifida, what it is, that he is paralyzed but otherwise just like their kids. It went over really well with the families I have since spoken to.

So, things are going well here. School is a piece of cake! Who would've thought?

 he's SO MAD that I stopped them for one more picture!

Friday, May 30, 2014

Hey There, Stranger

WWe are all alive and doing well ;) I'm going to attempt a recap of the past few months without boring you all. 


I guess first was Kingsley's MRI. It went just fine and the results were undramatic. Everything is stable. I have been panicking about Kingsley's scoliosis for the past year or so, I feel like it is getting worse. King's neuro did say that before we do anything with ortho to correct or stall the curve she would like to do a detethering. But right now no one thinks anything needs to be done, so basically chill out, mama. He will have an x-ray in the fall and they'll see how things are then. 


In other medical news, we have made the official, official, official decision to do the MACE and Mitrofanoff. The plan is to do them in February, right after Christmas and birthday excitement  are over, when there will be a lot of time to recover before summer. I'm. So. Nervous. I know it is the right decision for him, I'm so excited for it to be over. 


As May winds down, I'm so aware of the end of the school year coming. While I do love summer, it's dawned on me that come the end of June, Kingsley and I will not be alone anymore. The girls will be off for the summer and then they all go to school in September. My days at home with my baby are dwindling and that makes me sad! I have loved being at home with these kids far more than I ever thought I would. 


So, what have we been up to? Gardening, swimming, reading, and yoga mostly. I am forcing my interests on my children ;) Kingsley has recently gotten two new sets of wheels. Obviously, the kid cannot have enough wheels in his life. The first was a Radio Flyer Cyclone. It isn't made for kids who can't use their legs, but it works for him. Unlike the plasma car (which we also have and he likes), his legs have somewhere to rest without having to strap them on and the seat has a bit more stability. 


He also got a bike! Kingsley has been obsessed with bikes this year. He begs for one. He pleads for one. And like a gift from an angel, today one just showed up! King goes to a play group where there is a fabulous volunteer who has an adult son with SB. He had outgrown the bike, so they've given it to us! To say that Kingsley is in love is just such an understatement. He can't stop talking about it. He has made me promise over and over that he can ride it tomorrow aaa soon as he wakes up. It's such a gift. 


The rest of our days have just been filled with regular life stuff. I am on Instagram @jillbells That seems to have taken the place of my blogging lately. So much lazier. ;) 

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Sunshine

I feel badly that I posted a mopey post and then did not come back and blog for over a month. No worries, things are a-okay. It ended up being a good reminder for me about what happens to my head when I don't look after myself: after a week of the flu, not eating well, not working out, I could feel those ugly thoughts creeping up. That's about the only time they happen now.

Anyway, a few days after that I was back to normal and we haven't looked back. Everything and nothing have happened since then. I had my birthday, Rachel had her birthday. We had the longest, coldest, snowiest winter in decades. King had an MRI today to check everything over and see if his scoliosis is related to a tethered cord and if something needs to be done there. We've been doing more school planning, which has been great. Basically, we are all just doing really well. 

Who can be grouchy in the springtime sunshine?? 

Saturday, February 1, 2014

School

It is February and I have a four year-old, which in these parts mean one thing: SCHOOL. I know it's different across the country and everywhere else, but here our kids start Junior Kindergarten (JK) September of the year they turn 4, which means it is now time to register my boy. It's optional, I can wait until Senior Kindergarten (SK) or even grade one, I think. But I don't want to, he's ready for this.

Step One is registration. This happens right now. It involves contacting the school for a registration package and tour of the school, which we didn't need because the girls go to the school and I've been there enough. If your child is like most children, you drop off the paperwork and that's the end of it until the orientation stuff happens later in the year. If you're child is like Kingsley, you have to casually mention that to the school secretary. It's hard to be casual. We get to fill out all of the paperwork and then move on to step two.

Step Two is a meeting with the principal. The school secretary is going to call us back with a time. I'm told this is more of a casual meeting, just to feel things out and understand who Kingsley is.

Step Three is a big meeting with all of Kingsley's people and all of the school's people. We discuss what he will need to be successful in school and then how that will all be put in place, so I'm told.

I am not all that concerned at this point. Kingsley's needs are pretty straightforward:
* he needs a barrier-free environment, which the school is as far as I can tell
* he needs help with his bathroom business and medicine during lunch hour
* he needs someone to transfer him from his wheels to the floor or to a chair and then back whenever he wants
* he needs a chair at table height that is adapted somehow so that he can sit stably to do seat work and eat comfortably
* he needs someone to help him with his outdoor clothes, especially in winter and possibly help him navigate through recess
* as of now, he needs someone to make sure he eats, drinks, and doesn't choke or puke; this could change if he just decides eating is cool

The school should be able to figure all of that out. We are hoping that there will be an EA (educational assistant) in the room to help with the transfers and transitions to/from outside and hopefully with snacks/lunch and recess. I have no idea how the bathroom/medicine stuff works, but it will be figured out. Kingsely's current PT will help get the chair ready by September.

I have homework to do in the meantime. First, I have to figure out how to answer all of this paperwork. There are so many questions that don't have simple answers. Second, I have to make one of those All About Me books for Kingsley - an easy-to-read book discussing Kingsley's strengths, interests, diagnosis, needs, and whatever else I think his school should know about him. I have seen fabulous ones that are super creative. I am not creative. This will take some figuring out.


In the meantime, we are still in the depths of winter and up to our eyeballs in snow. It warmed up enough that I was able to take Kingsley out to play in the snow today, which he loves.


Monday, January 6, 2014

Winter on Wheels

Winter is here and it's been a brutal one. I know, I know, we live in Canada, the snow should not surprise me, but I kind of feel like we've had more than our fair share this year and now to add insult to injury, we are breaking records with the cold and wind. It's dreadful. It's only the start of January.


I think part of why this year seems worse than previous years is that it's the first time I've had to prepare all three kids for the horrid weather. Up until now, Kingsley has gone outside in the winter when I was interested in going outside... which is rare, hovering around 0C and has a nice, friendly snow. This year, he is in preschool and at preschool they go outside, no matter the weather. He plays outside at preschool, so now he thinks outside is all fun and snow is great. My glory days are over. This year, we play outside. Blech.

The weather shifted and snow hit the week Kingsley had his casts off, which was a godsend since you cannot fit snow pants or boots over casts and leg splints. I bought him Stonz boots again with a sherpa liner for warmth. They've been amazing. They fit amazingly over his AFO's and are very warm. I am going to cry when he outgrows these boots. There's nothing special about his snowsuit or any of his other gear, but putting it on is ridiculous. Dressing a typical child is not all that much fun. Dressing a child who needs endless layers to protect skin he cannot feel, who can barely sit up in that many layers, and who cannot push his foot into a boot is a downright gong show.


Remember the scene in A Christmas Story with Randy's snowsuit? This is my life right now. I work up a sweat, I'm exhausted. And many times Kingsley has laid on the floor when we're done, flailing around yelling about how he can't get up. Gong. Show.

Anyway, other thrilling escapades involve wheeling through snow, snow drifts, melting puddles of slush, puddles in general, salt and dirt. If you thought pushing a stroller through snowy sidewalks was bad, imagine not being able to tip that stroller back to get over the obstacles. Imagine lifting that dirty, snow covered stroller into your trunk over and over and over. Imagine pushing that dirt and snow covered stroller right on into your house.


I hate winter.

I'm trying very hard not to entertain the dismal thoughts running through my head about how Kingsley will cope with recess next year when he's in school full time. And when he's older and all the other kids are running through the snow. He'll be alright, right? He's not the first kid in a wheelchair in the winter.


If there's one good thing to come out of this, it's that Kingsley has started pushing his wheels with the hand rims instead of the actual wheel, to keep his hands clean.

Whine, whine, whiney, whine, whine. 

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Stable Like a Table

A midst the craziness of the first day of school yesterday for Rachel and Cordelia (grade 2 and SK), Kingsley had his follow up appointment with his neurosurgeon. The MRI showed nothing of interest! Everything was stable - his ventricles, his (potentially tethered but asymptomatic) cord, his (also asymptomatic) Chiari Malformation, and his syrinx which is all the same size, no bigger, no smaller and not causing any drama.

[exhale]

Such. A. Relief.



The girls had great first days of school. They both love their teachers and were excited to see their friends. No tears!

except Kingsley. he cried. smiling for pictures is pure torture before 9am.

Friday, June 21, 2013

The Big Wheels


“Why are they all staring?" demanded Albus as he and Rose craned around to look at the other students.
"Don’t let it worry you," said Ron. "It’s me. I’m extremely famous.” 

I have had that quote in my back pocket for two years now, just waiting for either Kingsley or the girls to notice the staring. People stare at Kingsley all the time. Sometimes blatantly, sometimes (not so)covertly. We have been at the girls school a lot in the past month so once again, I'm/he's getting the children gawkers and occasional brave question when they've slipped away from their parents: 'why does he use that?' Adults are different, they either avoid looking entirely, as if the wheelchair was wearing a wig of snakes, or they treat King 'special' because of it with waves, honks, extra candy (Halloween and Parades), and big 'HELLO!'s while ignoring his sisters.

People make assumptions about people in wheelchairs, that is becoming abundantly clear to me. Two major ones, I find. 

The first assumption is that they don't want to use their wheelchair, that it's some sort of burden. Let me clear this up right now: it's not. Kingsley LOVES his wheelchair. It is not as though he has the option of wheeling or walking and this is second place. His options are wheeling and being independent or staying where he is put down, waiting for someone to move him. Independence, at any age, is always preferred. Parents of kids like King often panic about this one: a life of confinement in a wheelchair, the horrors! How can they do that to their child? I can't speak for all kids, but I can never say enough how much Kingsley's life changed for the better when he got wheels. He was so passive before, never exploring, never moving. Now, he tortures me by trying to find ways to launch himself down any ramp at top speed. I am not burdened by his wheelchair. I love it. I love what it does for him. I love the independence he has. I do not love the lack of accessible kids activities, but I don't think this would be much better if he used a walker or any other mobility aid (were that possible, which it's not). 

I believe this assumption comes partly from our language, about which volumes have been written by the disabled community about our ableist biases. Right now, I don feel I need to get up in arms over whether Kingsley is IN a wheelchair or ON a wheelchair - I will one day take his lead on that - but I had a convo with my brother recently that I had to correct him on. He is a paramedic and was telling me a story about a call with a cool guy who was in his twenties, totally independent, nice guy, who uses a wheelchair. It went like this: 

BRO: ... so I was thinking about King the other day on this call, blah blah, and the guy was wheelchair bound so we got to talking about my [awesome] nephew and - 

ME: OMIGOSH!!!!

BRO: what? 

ME: with what? Is that why you were there? 

BRO: with what what? 

ME: what was he bound with? Ropes or chains? Did you have to cut him out of his wheelchair? Who did that to him???

BRO: oh. (Pause) Ah. Ok, ok. How do I say it? 

ME: he uses a wheelchair. Unless he was legit bound to it, but that would be abusive... Unless he's three and it's just a belt 'binding' him for safety... 

People aren't bound or confined to wheelchairs. They aren't torturous things. Like I said, the alternative is the state of confinement for Kinger. 

Wheelchair = freedom and independence
No wheelchair = bump on a log


The other assumption people make is a strange one. People assume he is intellectually disabled. I'm not sure what to make of this one. For starters, I'm not insulted by it as I do not think being intellectually disabled is an insult. I am just always caught off guard by it. Also, with SB there's a chance King may have learning disabilities once he gets to school. As of right now, we have no indication of any problems, he appears to be right on track with everything. 

The strange thing to me is how it's brought up. It's often by people I'm acquainted with. People who I'm closer to have just come out and asked if King's cognitive development has been effected and I'm fine talking about it. The main way others ask is by asking if King will go to the same school as the girls. I was so confused the first fifty or so times I was asked this. Of course he will? Where else would he go? I know in some places there are segregated or special schools. We don't have that at all here. There are a few classrooms in a couple schools for kids with ASD and then some for children with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and not all kids who fit either of these two diagnoses automatically go in those programs either, it's all case-by-case. Kingsley does not fit either criteria by a long shot. In fact, at this point I don't anticipate King needing any accommodations other than space, a private bathroom, and someone to help him take his mid-day meds, which we ensured when we switched schools. So, either people don't know that we no longer segregate kids with disabilities (which would be strange, since I'm pretty sure that hasn't happened in my lifetime) or they think he may belong in a special class. Which is a strange assumption since his wheelchair is the only thing indicating something different about him. 

There have been other comments also, like how I can keep him in high school until he is 21. Same idea, if it's needed, great. But I have no indication right now that he will need to make those victory laps to get through high school. Why would anyone else think that?

I have heard that as he gets older, people will start talking to me about him in front of him as if he can't understand or answer for himself. It happens now, but it's not abnormal to do this with kids his age.

People are strange about wheelchairs. I have tried thinking back to how I would have responded previously to someone using a wheelchair and I honestly can't remember. Maybe I was immune to stereotypes because I have spent most of my life working with people with physical and other disabilities and have had people-first language shoved in my face at every turn. Or maybe I was totally ableist and didn't even know it. Either way, I'm glad Kingsley is around to break down stereotypes for others. 

Monday, June 10, 2013

What's a Kid to Do?

The past year or so has been quite educational as far as what is accessible for children in our city. Kingsley has now had his wheelchair for 16 months and in that time I have been endlessly brainstorming about ways to keep him busy. Some places have been awesome. Some are total flops. There are so many things to do, places to go when you have children. So many places that you take for granted. You might notice how hard it is to maneuver a stroller through Gymboree, how inaccessible shopping is downtown, and even get irritated when the automatic door buttons are broken, but until you have an independently wheeling child, those annoyances suddenly become barriers in the most real sense.

Here is my run-down on the places in our 'hood that people hang out with kids:

1. Parks: there are designated parks in London that are meant to be more accessible and disability-friendly. It's a bunch of hooey. These parks usually include a play structure with a single ramp that Kingsley can roll up and hang out on a platform that then has steps up or down to get to the action. Sometimes there might be a bubble thing for him to look through. Wow. They also have dips in the concrete pathways that lead down to wood chips, I assume so that he can roll down into the wood chips? Brilliant. Unfortunately, the wood chips aren't usually topped up, so no matter where you're rolling into this section, you're dropping off a curb to get there. Into wood chips.

 yay! woodchips!!

wow! a ramp to stairs and a drop in the curb to roll on into those fun woodchips

There is usually a swing there that is for people with physical disabilities, in that it's a huge chair with a bars that come over your shoulders and connect between your legs, kind of like on a rollercoaster. They're adult sized. I read the fine print on the swing once, just trying to find out it's purpose as it is so big it fits two of my children at once. It says there are additional straps to support smaller people. The straps are not there.


There is ONE park we have found and - gloriously - it's the one closest to our new house! It has three whole ramps for King and each ramp leads to an actual activity, a piano, a finger maze, and I forget the other thing. Kingsley loves it. There are still wood chips, but (at least last summer) they were topped up to curb level and he loved to sit and play in them. It's a big playground with a lot of paths. It's not perfect, but it is somewhere that we can all go and have fun.


the school playground is also partially accessible

2. StoryBook Gardens: this is a big thing in our city and kids love it. I LOVED it when I was a kid, though it's changed a lot since then. When Kingsley was a baby, this was a great place to take the kids. Kingsley would nap, nurse, people watch, play in the huge sand pit, and have a great ol' time while the girls played. Now, not so much. The park itself is accessible and has lovely paths, but none of the structures, rides, or activities are wheelchair friendly. Kingsley is no longer content to sit and watch, so this place is out. Sadly.

3. Children's Museum: another huge thing for kids in our city and was when I was a kid as well. This place is accessible, has an elevator and ramps, activities at his level and that he can access, lots of fun. However, the museum has HUGE safety hazards in the form of big wide open stairwells on the upper levels. They are central stairs, right in the middle of the action and there is nothing to stop Kingsley from flying right down them or have another kid bump him in that direction. I am shuddering even typing that. There is also a big wide open stairwell down to a mermaid sand pit, where of course King loves to play. It gives me nightmares. It's on my to-do list to email them and tell them to put in some flippin posts at the top of the stairs, for Pete's sake. Until that happens (and I'm not holding my breath), we can't hang out there unless I'm one on one with King.

4. Indoor Playlands: there are basically three in this category - Adventures on Wonderland, Kidscape, and McDonald's. McDonald's is pretty much the same everywhere and they aren't accessible, not even remotely. And it's McDonald's. Kidscape and AOW have the same problem, being that they aren't accessible. They are big places with different spaces within them, lots of kids running here, there, and everywhere, back and forth. He can get in. He can sit and watch. As a baby, there were big mat areas where he could play, but that got old when the only thing I could do with him was PT exercises. Boring mommy ;)

5. Skating Arenas: they are accessible! We haven't been able to go this year, since my PT laughed at me when I asked if I could skate with a torn ACL, but last year we went and King had his borrowed sledge and did great. I have heard that you can even borrow sledges if you call ahead, but I don't know if that's true. The change rooms are just benches, like any skating place, I suppose. I'm not sure I've ever seen a change table, nevermind an accessible change table. We don't hang out long though, so have never needed one.

6. City Swimming Pools: they're kinda iffy. I mean, they are accessible, but not overly. A couple of them have lifts or ramps, but the city-run pools don't really have accessible change tables or spaces to change King other than a bench. It's fine now, at this age and with his abilities, but I know others have had issues with this. It's part of why we've put in a pool at our new house.

7. YMCA: oh, boy, I had high hopes for this place. ;) Fortunately, they have not let me down again! It's great. The change room is great, the pool has a ramp and a lift (though not to the shallow end, but this doesn't bother us right now). The gym, the playrooms, the activities for kids, and the whole place is very inclusive. Kingsley can go anywhere and do (almost) anything. They have a Treehouse room with a structure similar to the indoor playlands, but different in that there are things on ground level that King can wheel into/under. I've only gone to the one in the north end, but I hear the other Y's are also good.

8. Libraries: I can't say enough about how much I love our public libraries. We've been to a handful now, and not one has disappointed us. They all have train tables, books (obviously!), computers, tables at Kingsley's height, toys, floor space to sit and hang out... they're just awesome. We go weekly, sometimes more, all year round. All three kids love them. I love them. We love them. Except the family bathroom in the Westmount one has a hugely heavy door that does not have a button to open it. It's ridiculous. But other than that, love. ;)


9. Movies: Jeff and I have always been drive-in people. We used to drive his half-dead car with the dead stereo to the outskirts of the city and listen to the movies on a beat up old ghettoblaster that ate batteries for breakfast. It was cheap and we could bring our own snacks. Anyway, it's also a great place to bring babies because you can roll up the window or strap them in a wrap and go for a walk if they started to cry. Now, the kids understand what 'adult movie - go to bed' means so we wait until the first movie is a family movie and pack up the kids. The location itself is not accessible, not the bathrooms (unless there's separate one I've never noticed?),  not the gravel paths, nor the playground. But, we can all go and hang out by the van and play, get comfy in chairs and make it work for now.


We took Kingsley to his first movie theatre a week ago! It was great and he did surprisingly well, quite surprisingly considering how big and loud the theatre is. The only issue is that the wheelchair spaces are all down in front and the good theatres are the really big ones which means you'd have to be looking up to watch the movie. Not my favourite place to sit. We parked his wheels and he sat on my lap, which is where he wanted to be anyway.

10. Other People's Houses: this is one that is starting to become a problem and I don't see that changing. He's outgrowing his Bumbobile. His little bum and skinny legs fit in the seat just fine, but it's low to the ground and at his age, kids start to stand up more. To be at the level of his peers/sisters, he prefers his wheelchair or stander. Unfortunately, people's homes are not generally designed to be accessible so his big wheels don't fit and kids don't stay put. They run upstairs to show you their room, run downstairs to grab more toys, want to play outside... And Kingsley is left there with me and the other mom. I am getting better at inviting people to our house to play, since it's pretty kid friendly and King can obviously get anywhere. Even going downstairs, other kids are very eager to wait for Kingsley since it means they get to ride the elevator. This is one hurdle that won't get any easier as he grows up, but I'm not dwelling on it yet. We will tackle it as it comes.

11. Bowling: this is one rare gem that we've stumbled upon. There's a cool place here called the Palasad where you can play arcade games, bowl, eat, and a bunch of other stuff. There was one right by our old house that underwent big renovations and one of the things they did was make it completely accessible! I took the kids to a birthday party there recently, full of anxiety, and as soon as I walked in the door a staff member appeared out of thin air asking if King was going to bowl and they had a ramp there before we even got to the alley. I haven't been to the other big bowling-fun place here, Fleetway, but I'm told they are connected with an organization for adults with disabilities and have made sure it's accessible for everyone.



That's about all that I've found. The malls are also all accessible, but Kingsley's not a huge fan of shopping without an ice cream bribe. Fortunately right now we are surrounded by construction, which is still endlessly entertaining for Kingsley. When we get really bored, we walk up the street to the end of the subdivision where they are preparing the next field for an apartment building. There are a lot of diggers and dump trucks, cement trucks, and cranes around here. The construction crews are so friendly to Kingsley, waving and honking their horns. He loves it.

If there are more places to go that I don't know about, let me know! It's going to be a long summer. :)

Friday, April 26, 2013

Preschool

The girls both started preschool for two half days per week when they were 2.5-3 years old. We had planned on doing the same for Kingsley, but then faced two hurdles: 1. we were moving and things were chaotic, 2. I couldn't decide where to enroll him. Now that we've settled, it was my number 1 mission to make this happen for September.

It was slightly challenging finding the right preschool for Kingsley. I wanted something on the end of town we now live on (which ruled out the girls' preschool), it had to be accessible, and they had to want him there. I ended up picking a highly recommended one that I was familiar from having done a placement there waaaaaaay back when I was doing my undergrad a billion years ago. The staff was welcoming, they didn't hesitate when they found out King was on wheels and were already tossing out ideas on how to make the experience better for him when we went to visit. More importantly, after visiting for 5 minutes, Kingsley turned to me and said good-bye, essentially telling me to go away. ;)

Since then, I have had the very surreal experience of people talking to me about signing consent to share information forms, plans for transition meetings with all of this 'people', talks of idea sharing and consults... It makes me giggle a little bit. Once upon a time, I arranged endless transition meetings for parents and therapists, update meetings, consultations, report sharing. Now I'm on the other side of things and it's WEIRD. A kind of weird I'm going to have to get used to, I guess! :)

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Spectacle

"Hey, look!"
"Look at that kid..."
"Did you see him? Over there!"
"Mom! That boy is in a wheelchair!  LOOK! Mom! Mom! Over there! Mom, no wait Mom, look!"

Rachel and Cordelia just started school this week. Since we are moving at the end of this year, we were given permission to begin the girls at the school by our new house instead of the one that Rachel went to for JK and SK. As a result, we are at a big new school where no one knows us.... which lasted all of 1 minute.


It turns out, a two-year-old on wheels makes quite the spectacle. I kid you not, kids gather in crowds around us when we're waiting for the girls to go in the school or come out. The just come up and stare, in herds. It's one part rockstar status, one part a tad creepy. Most don't say a thing, just stare. Some like to touch his wheelchair, as if to confirm that it is not an illusion. Others try to talk to him. A handful ask questions, which make the other kids around stare harder with their eyes bulging, waiting to see if the brave kid is told off for asking questions or if I'll actually answer what they're all wondering: why is he in a wheelchair? 

I'm not really used to this. I suppose in the last year we have spent more of our time around adults, at stores, the library, the neighbourhood or in places where people just know Kingsley. At the school, there are just so many kids and so few adults to yank them away or hiss to be quiet. Kids are so blunt, so curious, so innocent.


The whole experience this week has made me very happy that we have a few years before Kingsley starts school there. He's so young now, he doesn't really notice the crowds, the stares and the questions. By the time he is four and in JK himself, the kids there will be used to him. They will just know him and his wheelchair will not be such a spectacle. I like that after one week in school, so many of the teachers and support staff are already on a first name basis with King and say hello when we come and go. I like that the school is only seven years old and is completely accessible, right down to the play equipment and the large, private, accessible bathroom.

The staring and the crowds don't bother the girls at all, nor me. Kingsley does stand up for himself when needed and has learned to say "Don't touch me, please!" (though it doesn't quite sound like that) when anyone touches his wheelchair. When asked, I tell the kids that Kingsley's legs don't work, that he was born this way, that he'll never walk and no, he can't stand on his own.


I also tell them that his name is Kingsley, he's two, and, yes, he is usually this grouchy in the morning.


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